How to Search for a Specific Emoji on iPhone

How to Search for a Specific Emoji on iPhone

Apple Blush Smiley Emoji Hero

Most of us use emoji on our iPhone, but until recently finding the right one has been tricky. Luckily, starting in iOS 14, you can now search for emoji directly within the Emoji keyboard in any app on an iPhone. Here’s how.

First, open the app you’d like to type an emoji into. Tap any text-input area, and when the on-screen keyboard appears, tap the emoji keyboard button.

On an iPhone or iPad, tap the "Emoji" keyboard button on the on-screen keyboard.

(If you don’t see the emoji button in your on-screen keyboard, that means the emoji keyboard has been deactivated in Settings. To get it back, navigate to Settings > General > Keyboard > Keyboards. Tap “Add New Keyboard.” Select, “Emoji.”)

When the emoji keyboard pops up, tap the “Search Emoji” text input area. If you don’t see the “Search Emoji” area, you’ll need to update your iPhone to iOS 14 or later first.

RELATED: How to Insert Emoji in Microsoft Word Documents 📝

On iPhone, tap the "search emoji" box.

Type in a word that describes the emoji you’re looking for, and you will see potential matches displayed horizontally in an area just under the search box. And you can search by category as well. For example, typing “fire” will bring up the flame emoji, a fireball, a firetruck, and more.

Type in a word in the emoji keyboard.

If you type in a word with a large number of potential matches (such as “animal” in this example), you can scroll through them by sliding your finger to the left or right along the search result bar. As you swipe, more emoji will be revealed.

Swipe through emoji search results with your finger on iPhone.

When you locate the emoji you’d like to use, tap it, and it will be inserted into the app you’re using.

Tap the emoji you'd like to use.

As of this writing, this technique only works on iPhone, but the emoji search bar may come to iPad soon in a future update. For now, if you’d like to search for emoji on your iPad, you’ll have to use the older “predictive text” technique.

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Lucila is a freelance writer and lifelong learner with an ongoing curiosity to study new things. She enjoys checking out the latest grammar books and writing about video games more than anything else. If she's not running through Colorado’s breathtaking landscape, she's indoors hidden away in her cozy game room trolling noobs and leveling up an RPG character. She is a Final Fantasy IX apologist (although she loves them all… except XV), coffee aficionado, and a bit of a health nut. Lucila graduated from Western Kentucky University with a B.A. in English Literature with a minor in Creative Writing.

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